IRS 2018 HSA Contribution Limits, Minimum Deductibles & Maximum Out-of-Pocket

The IRS published Revenue Procedure 2017-37 last week, specifying the IRS 2018 HSA contribution limits, along with the minimum deductibles and maximum out-of-pocket exposure for HSA-qualified plans.

IRS 2018 HSA contribution limits *

  • If you have individual coverage under an HSA-qualified plan: $3,450 (up from $3,400 this year)
  • If you have family coverage under an HSA-qualified plan: $6,900 (up from $6,750 this year)
  • Account holders who are 55 or older can make an additional “catch-up” contribution of $1,000, which is unchanged from this year.

IRS 2018 HSA Contribution Limits2018 minimum deductibles for HSA-qualified plans

  • Individual coverage: $1,350 (up from $1,300 this year)
  • Family coverage: $2,700 (up from $2,600 this year)

2018 maximum out-of-pocket for HSA-qualified plans

  • Individual coverage: $6,650 (up from $6,550 this year)
  • Family coverage: $13,300 (up from $13,100 this year)
  • Note that these amounts are lower than the maximum out-of-pocket allowed on other plans, which HHS has set at $7,350 for a single individual in 2018, and $14,700 for a family. In 2014, the maximum out-of-pocket allowed on any plan was the same as the maximum out-of-pocket allowed on HSA-qualified plans (HDHPs), but different formulas are used to adjust the two numbers, and they have diverged over time. As such, HSA-qualified plans are no longer the plans with the highest out-of-pocket exposure in most markets.

* The House of Representatives passed the American Health Care Act on May 4, and sent it to the Senate. The Senate is working on their own version rather than amending the House version, and the final bill, if enacted, is likely to have significant changes. But the AHCA currently calls for an increase in the amount people can contribute to HSAs, and that’s a provision that the Senate might be willing to keep. If the House version of the AHCA were to be enacted, IRS 2018 HSA contribution limits would increase as of January 1, 2018. They would be equal to the maximum out-of-pocket limit for HSA-qualified health plans, which is $6,650 for a single individual and $13,300 for family coverage. These amounts are considerably higher than the $3,450 (individual) and $6,900 (family) contribution limits that are currently slated to take effect as of January 1, 2018.

About Louise Norris

Louise Norris has been writing about health insurance and healthcare reform since 2006. In addition to the Colorado Health Insurance Insider, she also writes for healthinsurance.org, medicareresources.org, Verywell, Spark by ADP, and Boost by ADP. Follow on twitter and facebook.

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