IRS 2011 HSA Contribution Funding Limits


The IRS has just issued Revenue Procedure 2010-22, which outlines the 2011 cost-of-living contribution and coverage adjustments for HSAs, as mandated under Code Section 223(g). The limits for 2011 are unchanged from 2010: http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/rp-10-22.pdf

HDHP Minimum Deductible
You must still have coverage under an HSA-qualified “high deductible health insurance plan” (HDHP) to open and contribute to an HSA. Federal law still requires that in 2011 the health insurance deductible be at least:
Single          $1,200
Family         $2,400

HSA Contribution Amounts
Single          $3,050
Family         $6,150
Catch-up      $1,000

 

Maximum out-of-pocket amounts
Single          $5,950
Family         $11,900

What are 2012 HSA contribution limits?

What are the IRS 2013 HSA contribution limits?

About Jay Norris

Jay operates a health insurance brokerage in Colorado, where he helps individuals and small groups obtain and maintain health insurance coverage.
Complimenting his work as a health insurance broker, Jay also provides data analysis and creates visualizations that are easily understood by consumers and other stakeholders in Colorado’s health insurance market.

Comments

  1. Could I use my HSA for electromagnetic therapy

  2. I looked in IRS Publication 502 under E, but did not see electromagnetic therapy. You can see for yourself what is allowed there:
    http://www.irs.gov/publications/p502/ar02.html#en_US_publink1000178851

    Maybe it has another name?

  3. If I understand the law correctly, you could have $20,000 in your HSA, but the deductible can be no higher than these maximums.
    That is crazy!
    If a person has $20,000 in his HSA, he should have the option of a $20,000 deductible.
    That could save about 50% of the premiums off of the traditional plan.
    Hum, I wonder why that option was not provided in the law?
    Don Levit

  4. If I understand the law correctly, you could have $20,000 in your HSA, but the deductible can be no higher than these maximums.
    That is crazy!
    If a person has $20,000 in his HSA, he should have the option of a $20,000 deductible.
    That could save about 50% of the premiums off of the traditional plan.
    Hum, I wonder why that option was not provided in the law?
    Don Levit

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